AUTOMOTIVE MAINTENANCE

5 of the Strangest Armored Vehicles In History

Armored vehicles have been around since late in the World War I conflict, though evidence suggest that concepts of armored transport and military vehicles have been around since ancient times. Apparently for as long as there has been human conflict between nations, there has been some sort of Troyarmoring.com protective transport.  And with that in mind, here some of the strangest attempts in history to stay ahead of the armored transport curve.

The RHINO

Known as the “Rhino,” the Rhino Heavy Armored Car completed initial development in the first part of World War II.  The Australian government released the first Rhino in 1941, partly in response to the UK failing to meet certain needs requested from the Commonwealth nations.

The Rhino had an armored hull that measured about 30mm in thickness in the front and about 11m in thickness in the back and along the sides.  The vehicle also had a 30mm capped turret. Also, the Rhino featured a two-pound gun as well as a 7.7mm Vickers machine gun.

Alas, the Rhino met its end in 1943.

The FOX ARMORED CAR

Straightforward and stalwart, the four-wheeled Fox Armored Car was a project from General Motors Canada during WWII.  The original design mirrored British Humber Armored Car Mk III but adapted to match the Canadian Military Pattern (CMP) truck chassis.  While it did see more action than the Rhino, only 1,506 were ever manufactured.

The HUMBER LIGHT RECONNAISSANCE CAR MK IIA

More commonly known as the Humberette or Ironside, this is another oddball of the WWII era.  Based on the Humber Super Snipe chassis and the 4 x 4 Humber Heavy Utility car, this war machine was equipped with No 19 radio set, intended for reconnaissance missions. The British manufactured more than three thousand between 1940 and 1943

The OTTER LIGHT RECONNAISSANCE CAR

Simply called “the otter,” this vehicle is also a Canadian native, built for use with British and Commonwealth troops during WWII.  The Otter was based on the Chevrolet C15 Canadian Military Pattern truck chassis and was outfitted with hull-mounted bhoys and, of course, an anti-tank rifle. It was also equipped with a  Bren light machine gun, which sat atop a small, open turret.

The BOBIK

Manufactured by the GAZ automobile plant dfor the Soviet Army as the BA-64, the Bobik was a four-wheeled, lightly-armored scout vehicle that performed for liaison and reconnaissance missions between 1942 and the mid-1960s.

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